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STARS

  • http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/universe_level1/stars.html

    This page is for the K-4 grader who wants to know what a star is, what their life cycles are, and more! Glossary words are linked and there is a question at the end.

  • http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/universe_level2/stars.html

    Stars and the lives of stars are explained for 5-8 graders, complete with glossary terms linked and questions.

  • http://helios.gsfc.nasa.gov

    Produced by the ACE project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, this site is designed to increase interest in cosmic rays and heliospheric science. (The heliosphere is the HUGE area in space affected by the Sun.) It also includes some astrophysics basics, a glossary, a history of cosmic ray studies, and the chance to "Ask a Physicist." High school level or above.

  • http://www.maths.monash.edu.au/~johnl/StellarEvolnDemo/

    An extensive site for undergraduates showing characteristics of stellar evolution for stars like our Sun and slightly more massive than our sun. The movies show how composition, temperature, and density change within the star as it evolves. The movies illustrate how these changes are tracked on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The movies also include treatment of convective and radiative zones.

Books

  • Kaufmann, William J. III, Universe, Freeman and Company, 1994. This book comes highly recommended from both students and scientists. It explains many concepts in astronomy from cosmology to high-energy astrophysics, including information on stars (see Chapter 18). Intended for the upper high school student with a strong science background and interest, or the undergraduate science major taking a basic astronomy course.

  • Mitton, Jacqueline & Simon, The Young Oxford Book of Astronomy, Oxford University Press, Inc., 1995. This book explains many concepts in astronomy from the Solar System, galaxies, and the Universe. Intended for the middle or high school student.

  • Rosen, Sidney, How Far Is A Star?, Carolrhoda Books, Inc., 1992. With cartoon characters leading the way, you'll find out much about the lives of stars, how big they are, and how far away they are in this question-and-answer book. Intended for students in elementary school.

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STELLAR CORONAE
  • http://www3.gettysburg.edu/~marschal/clea/CLEAhome.html

    This lab, 'The flow of energy out of the Sun', was produced by Project CLEA. It shows how photons diffuse in a random-walk pattern from the core of a star, and how spectral lines are formed by random processes of absorption and re-emission in its atmosphere.

    The CLEA Project is associated with Gettysburg College, and develops laboratory exercises which illustrate modern astronomical techniques using digital data and color images. They are suitable for high school and college classes at all levels, but come with defaults set for use in introductory astronomy classes for non-science majors.

Books

  • Hufbauer, K., Exploring the Sun: Solar Science Since Galileo, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991. This book contains a more recent historical account of the development of solar physics from the early seventeenth century to the present. For students in high school and above.

  • White, O. R. (ed), The Solar Radiative Output and its Variations, Colorado Associated University Press, 1977. This book talks about the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. For students in high school and above.

  • Gaustad, John & Zeilik, Michael, Astronomy: The Cosmic Perspective- second edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1990. This text was designed for an introductory astronomy course for upper high school or undergraduate students who want a comprehensive view and understanding of modern astronomy, including the Sun and stellar coronae (see Chapter 16).

  • Giacconi, R. & Gursky, H., X-Ray Astronomy, D. Reidel Publishing Company. Known as a 'classic' X-ray astronomy text book. Includes discussion of stellar coronae (see Chapters 1, 2, & 5) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Giacconi, R. & Tucker, W., The X-ray Universe, Harvard University Press, 1985. Considered to be another 'classic' X-ray astromomy text book. Includes discussion of stellar coronae (see Chapter 12) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

Slide Sets

  • Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) Researchers Classroom Assistant Slide Set. This also has an information guide for high school classroom presentations. Topics include solar-terrestrial physics, magnetosphere, plasma, sunspots, aurora and much more. (24 slides, $30.00). For more information, contact the American Geophysical Union at http://www.agu.org/pubs/order.html

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SUN
  • http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/solar_system_level1/sun.html

    This is a site where K-4 students can learn about the Sun!

  • http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/solar_system_level2/sun.html

    All about the Sun for the 5-8 grader.

  • http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/

    This site showcases the SOHO (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory based at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center) satellite, which contains instruments intended to analyze the Sun during the quiet portion of the solar cycle. The SOHO gallery features images and information from each of the instruments. For students in high school and above.

  • http://solar-center.stanford.edu/

    This site presents a collection of fun educational activities based on Solar Oscillations Investigation (SOI) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) data. For students in middle school and above.

  • http://helios.gsfc.nasa.gov

    Produced by the ACE project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, this site is designed to increase interest in cosmic rays and heliospheric science. (The heliosphere is the HUGE area in space affected by the Sun.) It also includes some astrophysics basics, a glossary, a history of cosmic ray studies, and the chance to "Ask a Physicist." High school level or above.

  • www.spaceweather.com

    This site gives a daily picture of the Sun, allowing you to observe the current sunspot population. Topics include recent solar flares, aurora, coronal mass ejection. Lots of great pictures and time-lapse videos. Great for any age (K-12).

  • http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/sol.html

    A list of interesting Sun facts, with pictures, and lots of links. Middle school and above.

  • http://sec.gsfc.nasa.gov/

    Goddard's Sun-Earth Connection webpage. Includes information on all past, present, and future earth- and sun-related missions, and an education forum with resources for teachers. Check out the Scientific Visualization Studio to see movies of solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and animations that explain how auroras are formed. Most material appropriate for high school students.

  • http://solar-heliospheric.engin.umich.edu/hjenning/Home.html

    General information on the Sun and the Heliosphere. Allows the reader to choose from two learning levels. High school and above.

Books

  • Carlowicz, Michael J. and Lopez, Ramon E. "Storms from the Sun." Joseph Henry Press. 2002. This book is filled with technology, science, and the politics of space weather and is filled with colorful anecdotes. A good read for high school students or anyone with an interest in the Sun and how it affects satellites.
  • Hufbauer, K., Exploring the Sun: Solar Science Since Galileo, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991. This book contains a more recent historical account of the development of solar physics from the early seventeenth century to the present. For students in high school and above.

  • White, O. R. (ed), The Solar Radiative Output and its Variations, Colorado Associated University Press, 1977. This book talks about the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. For students in high school and above.

  • Gaustad, John & Zeilik, Michael, Astronomy: The Cosmic Perspective- second edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1990. This text was designed for an introductory astronomy course for upper high school or undergraduate students who want a comprehensive view and understanding of modern astronomy, including the Sun and stellar coronae (see Chapter 16).

  • Giacconi, R. & Gursky, H., X-Ray Astronomy, D. Reidel Publishing Company. Known as a 'classic' X-ray astromomy text book. Includes discussion of the Sun (see Chapters 1, 2, & 5) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Giacconi, R. & Tucker, W., The X-ray Universe, Harvard University Press, 1985. Considered to be another 'classic' X-ray astromomy text book. Includes discussion of the Sun (see Chapter 12) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Kaufmann, William J. III, Universe, Freeman and Company, 1994. This book comes highly recommended from both students and scientists. It explains many concepts in astronomy from cosmology to high-energy astrophysics, including information on the Sun (see Chapter 19). Intended for the upper high school student with a strong science background and interest, or the undergraduate science major taking a basic astronomy course.

  • Lang, Ken, "Sun, Earth,and Sky". This book would be appropriate for high school students.

  • Levy, David H., A Nature Company Guide: Skywatching, Time-Life Books, 1995. This book provides a general overview and discussion of astronomical objects, including the Sun. For students in middle school or above.

  • Rosen, Sidney, How Far is a Star?, Carolrhoda Books, Inc.,1992. With cartoon characters leading the way, you'll find out about our Sun and other stars in this question-and-answer book. Intended for students in elementary school.

  • Simon, Seymour, "The Sun." Mulberry Books. October 1989. A short book that exposes young children (ages 4-8) to large color images and facts about the Sun.

Slide Sets

  • Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) Researchers Classroom Assistant Slide Set. This also has an information guide for high school classroom presentations. Topics include solar-terrestrial physics, magnetosphere, plasma, sunspots, aurora and much more. (24 slides, $30.00). For more information, contact the American Geophysical Union at http://www.agu.org/pubs/order.html

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SUPERNOVA AND THEIR REMNANTS

Books

  • "The Young Oxford Book of Astronomy", by Mitton, Jacqueline & Simon; Oxford University Press, Inc., 1995. This book explains many concepts in astronomy from the Solar System, galaxies, and the Universe, including supernovae. Intended for the middle or high school student.

  • "How Far is a Star?", by Sidney Rosen; Carolrhoda Books, Inc.,1992. With cartoon characters leading the way, you'll find out about our Sun and other stars (including supernovae) in this question-and-answer book. Intended for students in elementary school.

  • "X-Ray Astronomy", by R. Giacconi & H. Gursky; D. Reidel Publishing Company. Known as a 'classic' X-ray astronomy text book. Includes discussion of supernovae (see Chapter 7) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • "The X-ray Universe", by R. Giacconi & W. Tucker; Harvard University Press, 1985. Considered to be another 'classic' X-ray astronomy text book. Includes discussion of supernovae (see Chapter 12) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • "Voyage Through the Universe: The New Astronomy", Time-Life Books. This volume is one of a series which examines the Universe in all its aspects. General information for the upper high school student (and above), related to supernovae, will be found in the 'An Expanding Spectrum' or 'Signatures of the Stars' chapter.

  • "Nebulae: The Birth and Death of Stars", by Necia Apfel; ISBN 0-688-07229-1, Lothrop, Lee and Shepard, 1988. Aimed at elementary grades.

  • "Superstar: The Supernova of 1987", by Franklin Branley; HarperCollins, 1990, ISBN 0-690-04839-4, grades 6-8

Magazine Articles

  • "SN 1987A: The First Ten Years", by Robert P. Kirshner; Sky and Telescope, February 1997, vol. 93, no. 2. Discussion on the supernova that has taught us much about stellar evolution. Intended for the high school student who is interested in science, and above.

  • "Searching for Outbursts", by Guy M. Hurst, Astronomy Now, September 1995, vol. 9, no. 10. Discussion about how amateur astronomers can help in the search for supernovae. Intended for the high school student interested in science, or above.

  • "A New Dimension to Supernovae" Sky and Telescope. August 1995. Good resource for high school students and teachers.

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ULTRAVIOLET
See MULTIWAVELENGTH ASTRONOMY.

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VISIBLE
See MULTIWAVELENGTH ASTRONOMY.

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WHITE DWARFS

Books

  • Gaustad, John & Zeilik, Michael, Astronomy: The Cosmic Perspective- second edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1990. This text was designed for an introductory astronomy course for upper high school or undergraduate students who want a comprehensive view and understanding of modern astronomy, including white dwarfs (see Chapters 20 & 21).

  • Giacconi, R. & Gursky, H., X-Ray Astronomy, D. Reidel Publishing Company. Known as a 'classic' X-ray astromomy text book. Includes discussion of white dwarfs (see Chapters 4 & 6) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Giacconi, R. & Tucker, W., The X-ray Universe, Harvard University Press, 1985. Considered to be another 'classic' X-ray astromomy text book. Includes discussion of white dwarfs (see Chapter 6) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Kaufmann, William J. III, Universe, Freeman and Company, 1994. This book comes highly recommended from both students and scientists. It explains many concepts in astronomy from cosmology to high-energy astrophysics, including information on white dwarfs (see Chapter 22). Intended for the upper high school student with a strong science background and interest, or the undergraduate science major taking a basic astronomy course.

  • Levy, David H., A Nature Company Guide: Skywatching, Time-Life Books, 1995. This book provides a general overview and discussion of astronomical objects, including white dwarfs. For students in middle school or above.

  • Mitton, Jacqueline & Simon, The Young Oxford Book of Astronomy, Oxford University Press, Inc., 1995. This book explains many concepts in astronomy from the Solar System, galaxies, and the Universe, including white dwarfs. Intended for the middle or high school student.

  • Rosen, Sidney, How Far is a Star?, Carolrhoda Books, Inc.,1992. With cartoon characters leading the way, you'll find out about our Sun and other stars (including white dwarfs) in this question-and-answer book. Intended for students in elementary school.

  • Seward, Frederick D. and Charles, Philip A., Exploring the X-ray Universe, Cambridge University Press, 1995. Explains X-ray astronomy and astrophysics along with its most recent developments. Intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Voyage Through the Universe: The New Astronomy, Time-Life Books. This volume is one of a series which examines the Universe in all its aspects. General information for the upper high school student (and above), related to white dwarfs, will be found in the 'An Expanding Spectrum' chapter.

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X-RAY ASTRONOMY
  • http://rxte.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/xte/learning_center/

    The RXTE Learning Center offers secondary teachers and their students resources for learning about the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and fundamental elements of X-ray astronomy.

  • http://hea-www.harvard.edu/scied/

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory High-Energy Astrophysics Division Science Education Resources Web site is a resource for funding opportunities, generating ideas for educational programs, and a companion to the many education and public outreach projects currently underway.

Books

  • Seward, Frederick D. and Charles, Philip A., Exploring the X-ray Universe, Cambridge University Press, 1995. Explains X-ray astronomy and astrophysics along with its most recent developments. Intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

Slide Sets

  • "ROSAT: Exploring the X-ray Universe" slide set. 28 images of various objects from the ROSAT mission. Available from Astronomical Society of the Pacific (cat.# AS222) $32.95. Order by phone at 1-800-335-2624 (credit card only) or by FAX at 1-415-337-5205 using order form in catalog. For a free catalog write to: Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Catalog Dept., 390 Ashton Ave., San Francisco, CA, 94112

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X-RAY BINARIES

Magazine Articles

    Powell, Corey S., "All in the Timing," Scientific American. Dec 1996. "When seen though RXTE's eyes, the sky flares with radiation from a class of variable stars known as x-ray binaries."

Newspaper Articles

  • "'One Man Band' star mystifies astronomers" by Paul Hoversten; USA TODAY; 02-29-1996; Reading Level: Grade 6

  • "NASA brings its X-ray vision to the Universe; Telescope will capture wonders not seen before"; by Tim Friend; USA TODAY; 06-17-1997; Reading Level: Grade 10.

Books

  • "Voyage Through the Universe: Stars", Time-Life Books. This volume is one of a series which examines the Universe in all its aspects. General information for the upper high school student (and above), related to X-ray binaries, will be found in the 'Neutron Stars and Black Holes' chapter.

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X-RAY TELESCOPES AND DETECTORS
  • http://constellation.gsfc.nasa.gov/

    The homepage for NASA's future mission, Constellation-X. Site includes information for all levels, including mission goals, instrumentation, and a great multimedia section. Middle school and above.

  • http://chandra.nasa.gov/

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory website. The site does a great job of answering common questions about X-rays and their significance to modern astronomy. Also has a great gallery of images taken by Chandra. High school and above.

  • http://asca.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/outreach.html

    The education page for ROSAT, an X-ray mission that was completed in 1999. Provides resources for teachers and high school students.

  • http://asca.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/astroe_lc/

    The Astro-E2 learning center. The mission is scheduled to launch in early 2005. This site is dedicated to education, providing scientific explanations of the missions, photographs, and resources for teachers. High school and above.

Magazine Articles

  • "Focus: X-ray Astronomy", by Martin Barstow; Astronomy Now, January 1997, vol. 11, no. 1. Discusses astronomy observations using X-ray techniques and detectors. Intended for the high school student interested in science, or above.

  • "X-ray Detectors in Astronomy" by George Fraser, Cambridge University Press.

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X-RAY TRANSIENTS

Books

  • Giacconi, R. & Gursky, H., X-Ray Astronomy, D. Reidel Publishing Company. Known as a 'classic' X-ray astronomy text book. Includes discussion of X-ray transients (see Chapter 6) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Giacconi, R. & Tucker, W., The X-ray Universe, Harvard University Press, 1985. Considered to be another 'classic' X-ray astronomy text book. Includes discussion of X-ray transients (see Chapter 6) at a level intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

  • Seward, Frederick D. and Charles, Philip A., Exploring the X-ray Universe, Cambridge University Press, 1995. Explains X-ray astronomy and astrophysics along with its most recent developments. Intended for the undergraduate science major, or above.

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Imagine the Universe! is a service of the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), Dr. Alan Smale (Director), within the Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

The Imagine Team
Project Leader: Dr. Barbara Mattson
Curator: Meredith Gibb
Responsible NASA Official: Phil Newman
All material on this site has been created and updated between 1997-2014.
This page last updated: Wednesday, 09-Jan-2008 15:18:09 EST