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Special Exhibits

Special Exhibits

Satellites

Satellites

Probing the structure and evolution of our Universe and the objects its contains requires, in general, that we make our observations above Earth's absorbing atmosphere. Starting with sounding rocket flights in the late 1940s, scientists have been able to develop ever-better instruments to probe deeper into space and finer into the details of our cosmos. This section will allow you to learn about the satellites and missions which have provided scientists the foundation of "what we know".
Scientist Profiles

Scientist Profiles

What do all scientists have in common? No, it is not that they wear pocket protectors or are geeks. It is that they all ask questions. Lots and lots of questions, since asking questions about what you see is one way to figure out how things work. Here at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, there are lots of people working towards a better understanding of the Universe around us. However, it is not always clear how particular observations can shed light on how our Universe works. Have you ever wondered how scientists work to understand the things in the skies around us? Have you ever wondered what the rocket scientists at NASA DO at work all day? Or how they spend their weekend?
You Be the Astrophysicist!

You Be the Astrophysicist!

Many times, the best way to learn about something is to do it. We think the best way to learn about what an astrophysicist does would be to spend a day (or two or three) in the shoes of one. But since we don't have room for everyone who visits our web site to visit our lab, we've tried to do the next best thing. In these web pages, you will be given a real problem in astronomy which you solve by traveling through web pages, exploring different options and learning many different things along the way.
  • Satellites - Probing the structure and evolution of our Universe and the objects its contains requires, in general, that we make our observations above Earth's absorbing atmosphere. Starting with sounding rocket flights in the late 1940s, scientists have been able to develop ever-better instruments to probe deeper into space and finer into the details of our cosmos. This section will allow you to learn about the satellites and missions which have provided scientists the foundation of "what we know".

  • Scientist Profiles - What do all scientists have in common? No, it is not that they wear pocket protectors or are geeks. It is that they all ask questions. Lots and lots of questions, since asking questions about what you see is one way to figure out how things work. Here at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, there are lots of people working towards a better understanding of the Universe around us. However, it is not always clear how particular observations can shed light on how our Universe works. Have you ever wondered how scientists work to understand the things in the skies around us? Have you ever wondered what the rocket scientists at NASA DO at work all day? Or how they spend their weekend?

  • You Be the Astrophysicist! - Many times, the best way to learn about something is to do it. We think the best way to learn about what an astrophysicist does would be to spend a day (or two or three) in the shoes of one. But since we don't have room for everyone who visits our web site to visit our lab, we've tried to do the next best thing. In these web pages, you will be given a real problem in astronomy which you solve by traveling through web pages, exploring different options and learning many different things along the way.

 

A service of the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), Dr. Alan Smale (Director), within the Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at NASA/GSFC

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