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Imagine the Universe!

Telescope Learning Centers

The mini-websites contain background information and educational resources to about selected satellites. Follow the links below to learn more about XMM-Newton, Swift, and Fermi.

Illustration of the Fermi satellite in space
The Universe is home to numerous exotic and beautiful events, some of which can generate unimaginable amounts of energy. Supermassive black holes, merging neutron stars, streams of hot gas moving close to the speed of light ... these are but a few of the marvels that generate gamma-ray light. Gamma-rays are the most energetic form of radiation, billions of times more energetic than the light our eyes can detect. What is happening to produce this much energy? What happens to the surrounding environment near these phenomena? The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which launched on June 11, 2018, is opening this high-energy world to exploration and helping us answer these questions.
Learn more about theFermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the high energy universe using this mini-site, which was initially developed by the Education and Public Outreach Group at Sonoma State University.
Illustration of the Swift satellite in space
Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science. Its three instruments work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma-ray, X-ray, optical, and ultraviolet wavebands. Swift was launched into a low-Earth orbit on a Delta 7320 rocket on November 20th, 2004. As of April 2018, Swift has observed more than 1300 bursts.
Learn more about the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory and gamma-ray bursts using this mini-site, which was initially developed by the Education and Public Outreach Group at Sonoma State University.
Illustration of the XMM-Newton satellite in space
XMM-Newton is a joint NASA-European Space Agency (ESA) orbiting observatory, designed to observe high-energy X-rays emitted from exotic astronomical objects such as pulsars, black holes and active galaxies. It was launched on December 10, 1999 from the ESA base at Kourou, French Guiana and continues to make observations today.
Learn more about XMM-Newton and the high energy sky using this mini-site, which was initially developed by the Education and Public Outreach Group at Sonoma State University.